Sunday, November 24, 2013

Justin Rosario: Proud to be Ableist Scum

So, I just got a nasty message from the parent of a child with autism. Justin Rosario is the creator of Addictinginfo.org and, apparently got pissed because after making ableist insults about folks with autism, several of us with autistic kids in our lives disagreed with him. I said "Autism definitely does NOT suck. What sucks is people who can't appreciate the awesomeness of having it."

He sent me the following message and then blocked me to prevent a response:

"Awesomeness. Yes, I'll pass that on to my son who can't speak. He's loving every second of autism and I'm sure the many people with autism that cannot communicate or even go without diapers are all enamored of its awesomeness as well. How nice for you."

Fortunately, I was able to visit his personal blog and respond there. LOL Perhaps if Justin had autism, he'd realize that there are many ways of communicating with people and not being able to use one method doesn't mean you're incapable of using another.

I doubt that this ableist asshole will post my comment, so I'll just paste it here:

Justin, thank you so much for the nasty message in my inbox. Many of us have been parenting children with autism much longer than you have. Yet we see no reason for the kind of disgusting ableism that you engage in. It’s a bit sad that you can’t believe that your child is awesome simply because he doesn’t meet your expectations. Perhaps if you become active in disability communities you’ll find out that many people on this planet wear diapers and many of them are people that you don’t know how to communicate with. That doesn’t mean they aren’t enjoying their lives. In fact, many people with autism ALREADY HAVE spoken and written quite a lot about their lives. Curiously, they don’t share your disdain for their lives. You would do well to listen to them, instead of making life harder for people like your son. This video will help you, if you ever decide to stop feeling sorry for yourself and start appreciating the life you’ve been privileged to care for:

1 comment:

Zen Angel said...

What a wonderful post. As the mother of a child with autism and Tourette's (a much misunderstood disorder), I applaud you. As a disabled person myself, I add more applause.

My sister Lisa had severe cerebral palsy. She could not see, walk or talk in a conventional manner (she was much like a baby, and those who knew her well knew the sounds for hungry, bored, dirty diaper and so on). She was a happy, beautiful, wonderful person. Many people thought she had no quality of life. These people were fools.

She died in 2010. I still miss that happy sound she would make when she heard my voice.